Review: Danny and the Deep Blue Sea (Wolf Manor Theatre Collective)

Two troubled souls meet in a bar in this exciting site-specific play on stage in Toronto

Two seemingly mismatched but deeply troubled souls meet at bar, and events spiral clumsily and rapidly from there in Danny and the Deep Blue Sea. The two-hander site specific show takes place in a local bar. Having just completed their run at the Imperial Pub on Dundas, Wolf Manor Theatre Collective will continue their run at the ROUND Venue beginning January 19-22, 2017.

Right from the start, the show is abrasive and uncomfortable. It is vulgar, raw and gritty, but all of these aspects forces the audience to sit and take notice. As the story progresses in this dark and dingy bar, the characters blossom, their relationship gels, and you can’t help but feel for them. Watching this performance is not easy and there are many themes present that may be triggering and will likely stir up uneasy emotions–at first I thought I wasn’t going to enjoy myself, but I found myself enthralled in the end.

Continue reading Review: Danny and the Deep Blue Sea (Wolf Manor Theatre Collective)

Review: From Broadway to Obscurity… (Cabaret Soiree)

ERIC_GUTMAN_FB2O-256

Eric Gutman, the creator and star of From Broadway to Obscurity, has a tremendous gift for impressions, especially musical impressions. There’s a while in the middle of his performance where he talks about his time working on Forbidden Broadway. Gutman sings a lively, story-studded medley of Gerald Allesandrini’s best-known and most pointed songs, and this 20 minutes of the performance is totally delightful. The rest of it, to be honest, I could have taken or left (and would have mostly preferred to leave).

Continue reading Review: From Broadway to Obscurity… (Cabaret Soiree)

Playlistings in Toronto for the week of January 16th

Shows That Caught Our Eye in Toronto the Week of January 16th

We’ve got some exciting themes happening in our listings this week. From love, sex, math, to feminism, misogyny, and of course a bloody musical, there are so many unique shows to choose from! To help you out, our editor Samantha is here to highlight a fews shows that caught her eye in red text. Check them out below the cut:

Continue reading Playlistings in Toronto for the week of January 16th

Review: The Dining Room (Plainstage Theatre Company)

Plainstage Theatre Company presents a play examining WASP culture, on stage in Toronto

If you’re in the mood to see a Gilmore Girls-esque series of scenes deconstructing WASP culture, then head out to the Plainstage Theatre Company‘s The Dining Room, playing at The Box Theatre this weekend (January 13-15, 2017).

The Plainstage Theatre Company aims to rehearse and mount shows in a very short time frame. The idea being that this gives artists experience and stage-time without cutting into their professional and personal lives, something that even community theatre is guilty of doing. I love this idea and would absolutely recommend friends to get involved and even consider doing so myself. Continue reading Review: The Dining Room (Plainstage Theatre Company)

Review: Sequence (Tarragon Theatre)

Nancy-Palk-Ava-Jane-Markus-Kevin-Bundy-Jesse-LaVercombe-in-Sequence-photo-by-Cylla-von-Tiedemann-2-1024x635Sequence, at the Tarragon Theatre in Toronto, explores concepts including science and faith

In Sequence, onstage at Tarragon Theatre, two separate narratives play out in the same space, at the same time, exploring the same themes: science and faith, luck, coincidence and probability. A mathematician confronts a man famous for a twenty year streak of winning Super Bowl bets on the flip of a coin; a fundamentalist Christian confronts a stem cell geneticist working on a cure for her own degenerative disease. The stories never intersect, but they have unlikely — one might say improbable — details in common. Continue reading Review: Sequence (Tarragon Theatre)

Playlistings in Toronto for the week of January 9th

Shows That Caught Our Eye in Toronto the Week of January 9th

 As the Next Stage Theatre is well underway, we highlight some of their offerings, as well as some classics, satire, kid-friendly shows, and much more! To help you choose from our extensive listing this week, our publisher Megan is here to highlight a fews shows that caught her eye in red text. Check them out below the cut:

Continue reading Playlistings in Toronto for the week of January 9th

Review: Infinity (Tarragon Theatre and Volcano Theatre)

Tarragon_Infinity
Tarragon_Infinity

Infinity is “memorable, compelling drama” on the Tarragon stage in Toronto

Tarragon Theatre and Volcano Theatre’s co-production of Infinity is a stirring philosophical drama that stays mostly grounded in the humanity of its characters — a play about the messiness of careers, relationships, and the troublesome notion of passion. I had high expectations of playwright Hannah Moscovitch, and I’m happy to say that Infinity did not disappoint.

Infinity offers an ambitious mixture of philosophy, physics, and music. For me, a particular highlight of the production was the beautiful series of performances by violinist Andréa Tyniec, who haunts the background of this play through the semitransparent back wall of the set.

Continue reading Review: Infinity (Tarragon Theatre and Volcano Theatre)

2017 Next Stage Festival Review: The Death of Mrs. Gandhi and the Beginning of New Physics (Everything but the Bard)

maggie-and-benazir-mrs-gandhi

The Death of Mrs. Gandhi and the Beginning of the New Physics by Kawa Ada is a current main stage production in the Next Stage Theatre Festival. Next Stage Theatre Festival showcases the work of established Fringe Festival artists who have demonstrated the tenacity and ingenuity to take their work to the “next stage”. The festival is comprised of remounts from the Fringe Festival, and many new works by Fringe artists. Continue reading 2017 Next Stage Festival Review: The Death of Mrs. Gandhi and the Beginning of New Physics (Everything but the Bard)

2017 Next Stage Theatre Festival Review: Western, a play with music (The Harvey Dunn Campfire)

SONY DSC

For the first ten minutes or so, Western, a play with music (playing as part of Next Stage Theatre Festival) is somewhat misty and disorienting. It doesn’t sit you down and hold your hand and walk you through it’s premise, but rather introduces it in a slow burn, a collaborative campfire fantasy that’s equal parts blood and poetry. Puppetry and clever staging introduce you slowly to the characters and the shared trauma they’re all determined to relive: the accidental killing of one boy by another that kickstarts a manhunt across a great unidentified landscape. Continue reading 2017 Next Stage Theatre Festival Review: Western, a play with music (The Harvey Dunn Campfire)