Review: Heathers: the musical (Hart House Theatre)

Heathers: The musical, currently showing at Hart House Theatre, is based on the cult classic 80s film of the same name, a dark comedy that depicts how the struggle for popularity— and, for some, just plain acceptance—can lead to hate and violence. It is teen angst with a death count. For the most part, the musical follows the same plot and characters and has a similar campy appeal. Continue reading Review: Heathers: the musical (Hart House Theatre)

Review: A Little Black Lie (Crossfieldhouse Productions)

Photo of the cast of Little Black Lie

After I got home from seeing A Little Black Lie at the Berkeley Street Theatre I took a minute to look at the program. In the playwright notes Troy Crossfield says “Looks like we’re creating a soap opera and you get front tickets.” He’s referring to his play, A Little White Lie which was on stage a year ago. It’s referenced a fair bit in A Little Black Lie but you don’t need to have seen it, the references are self-explanatory.

He’s right for a couple of reasons. While I was watching the play last night I thought more than once that it should be a TV show or a movie. Or three plays. Continue reading Review: A Little Black Lie (Crossfieldhouse Productions)

Review: The Valley (Don’t Look Down)

Four people on a black backdrop, looking somber.A play by Joan MacLeod igniting conversations about mental health is now on stage in Toronto

The Valley by Don’t Look Down Theatre Company hopes to ignite conversations about mental health. It’s taking place in Theatre Passe Muraille’s (16 Ryerson Ave.) backspace until September 23, 2018 and I thought it made for a memorable show.

The Passe Muraille Backspace is tiny and chilly from the AC. The tough content of this show certainly won’t warm you, but perhaps the dialogue it inspires will. This is a show about four characters in Vancouver and how their lives are affected by mental illness.

Continue reading Review: The Valley (Don’t Look Down)

Review: Dr. Silver: A Celebration of Life (Outside the March/The Musical Stage Company)

Photo of Kira Guloien, Bruce Dow, Donna Garner and the Edge of the Sky Young Company of Dr. Silver: A Celebration of Life by Dahlia Katz.A cult leader’s funeral is the setting for a new musical by Toronto’s Anika and Britta Johnson

There’s definitely an air of mystery around Dr. Silver: A Celebration of Life; a new, immersively-staged musical taking over Heliconian Hall in the heart of Yorkville. The casual theatre-goer would be forgiven if they had no clue what Dr. Silver was about from the show’s deliberately sparse website which only hints that it centres on the funeral of a charismatic nouveau-spiritual leader and doesn’t really provide much more detail than that. Continue reading Review: Dr. Silver: A Celebration of Life (Outside the March/The Musical Stage Company)

Playlistings in Toronto for the week of September 17th, 2018.

Shows that Caught Our Eye in Toronto for the Week of September 17th, 2018

Get over you post TIFF blues by checking out some of the awesome theatre around the city. MoT has you covered with some excellent options, guaranteeing something for every sort of theatre-goer! My top picks are in red if you are looking for any suggestions!

Continue reading Playlistings in Toronto for the week of September 17th, 2018.

Review: I Call myself Princess (Paper Canoe Projects/Cahoots Theatre/Native Earth Performing Arts)

I Call myself Princess, Jani Lauzon’s “play with opera,” is now playing at Toronto’s Aki Studio

Written by Jani Lauzon, I Call myself Princess is a powerful, captivating play that addresses Indigenous identity and culture. Playing at Toronto’s Aki Studio, this musical performance is above all an eye-opener.

Continue reading Review: I Call myself Princess (Paper Canoe Projects/Cahoots Theatre/Native Earth Performing Arts)

Review: Dry Land (Cue6 Theatre)

Photo of Mattie Driscoll in Dry LandToronto’s Cue6 Theatre presents Ruby Rae Spiegel play taking on teen abortion

Cue6 Theatre’s production of Dry Land opened on Friday at The Assembly Theatre. Playwright Ruby Rae Spiegel was only 21 when the play was first produced. One of the things that motivated her was reading an article about the rise of DIY abortions. Given the changes to the laws in the U.S. over the past few years it’s a timely topic. It’s one we can’t afford to ignore here either. Unfortunately.

This makes it sound as if Dry Land is a political play. It isn’t. The publicity says it’s a play about “abortion, female friendship, and resiliency“. It’s funny, and agonizing, and wonderful. My friend Marg and I both loved it. Continue reading Review: Dry Land (Cue6 Theatre)