All posts by Chris Klippenstein

Love and Information (Randolph Academy) 2017 Toronto Fringe Review

The cast of "Love and Information"

There’s a lot happening in Love and Information, produced by the Randolph Academy for the Performing Arts and playing at the Toronto Fringe Festival. Featuring a talented ensemble cast, this play is structured as a series of unconnected short scenes. There’s much to enjoy in this well-acted, polished production — as long as you’re not looking for a linear narrative.

Continue reading Love and Information (Randolph Academy) 2017 Toronto Fringe Review

Olive Copperbottom: A New Musical (Penash Productions) 2017 Toronto Fringe Review

Photo of performer Penny Ashton

Olive Copperbottom: A New Musical by Charles Dickens and Penny Ashton, produced by Penash Productions, brings an abundance of Victorian delights to the Toronto Fringe Festival. Inspired by Charles Dickens and bolstered by fun musical numbers and a tremendous amount of energy from one-woman performer Penny Ashton, this was a show I enjoyed down to the very last drop — of gin, obviously.

Continue reading Olive Copperbottom: A New Musical (Penash Productions) 2017 Toronto Fringe Review

The Life Henri (Still Your Friend) 2017 Toronto Fringe Review

Photo from "The Life Henri"

The Life Henri, produced by Still Your Friend and playing at the Toronto Fringe Festival, takes us on a vivid and touching journey through the life of nineteenth-century French painter Henri Rousseau. However, this show isn’t just for art lovers; performer Adam Bailey, directed by Laura Anne Harris, tells Rousseau’s story with great humour and humanity.

Continue reading The Life Henri (Still Your Friend) 2017 Toronto Fringe Review

Review: En avant, marche! (NTGent & les ballets C de la B)

Photo from "En avant, marche!"“Fearless” Luminato show takes to the Toronto stage

It was a huge pleasure to attend En avant, marche!, co-produced by NTGent & les ballets C de la B and presented by Luminato. This wonderfully entertaining multidisciplinary show filled the stage at the St Lawrence Centre for the Arts with music, dance, and heart. With four actor-performers, seven Belgian musicians, and a brass band, there was never a dull moment.

The show centers around a musician (Wim Opbrouck) whose cancer diagnosis has forced him to trade his beloved trombone for a pair of cymbals. Far from being melancholy, however, En avant, marche! ricochets joyously from one feeling to another: it is at times funny, bizarre, profound, raunchy, and filled with visual and musical delights.

Continue reading Review: En avant, marche! (NTGent & les ballets C de la B)