All posts by Lin Young

Lin Young is a PhD candidate in the English Department at Queen’s University by day, an insatiable theatre-goer by night. She truly loves seeing innovative indie theatre, the strange sort of hole-in-the-wall shows that big companies would never take a risk on. She’s seen plays in basements, gardens, bars, and in old dilapidated houses, to name a few. She’s always on the lookout for the next theatrical experiment in the city, and loves seeing shows that have some quality of fantasy, historicity, or strangeness to them – especially if they involve puppets! She tweets about theatre, comics and the 19th century at @linkeepsitreal.

Review: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time (Mirvish)

Fabulously staged Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time comes to the Toronto stage

When you enter the Princess of Wales theatre for Mirvish’s The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, you’re essentially walking into a giant cube made up of grids and pinpoints of light. Everything is mathematically precise, with the entire world of the stage sectioned off into regimented squares and shapes. This is the world of Christopher Boone, a 15-year-old math genius who has what the book the play is based on describes as “behavioural difficulties.” Continue reading Review: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time (Mirvish)

Review: Arabella (Canadian Opera Company)

Canadian Opera Company brings shades of grey to Arabella to the Toronto stage

The final collaboration of Richard Strauss and librettist Hugo von Hofmannsthal, Arabella is either a deceptively grim meditation on love in society, a typical comedy of manners, a proto-feminist parable of the volatile position of women in the marriage market, or a light and frothy romance. Sometimes it can be all of these things at once. I’m not entirely sure which The Canadian Opera Company‘s adaptation of Strauss’ Arabella wants to be — but that very ambiguity is what makes it interesting. Continue reading Review: Arabella (Canadian Opera Company)

Fringe for Free! Toronto Fringe Ticket Giveaways for Shows on Friday, July 14

Fringe For Free Graphic We’re almost at the end of the festival, and this is (sadly) the last day of contests from us here at Mooney on Theatre! Hopefully you’ve had time to see most of the shows you want, but just in case, we’ve got six final shows that might strike your fancy! Check ’em out beneath the cut and make some plans for Friday, July 14th!

Continue reading Fringe for Free! Toronto Fringe Ticket Giveaways for Shows on Friday, July 14

Fringe for Free! Toronto Fringe Ticket Giveaways for Shows on Tuesday, July 11th

Fringe For Free GraphicAs the Toronto Fringe Festival rolls merrily along, we hope you’ve had time to take in a wide variety of shows, from the immersive plays to the dance showcases to the sketch comedy shows!

With such a wide variety to choose from thanks to the 160-show output this year, you almost certainly haven’t seen everything worth seeing yet. That’s where we come in: below the cut, we’ve got five more shows up for grabs for Tuesday, July 11th! Continue reading Fringe for Free! Toronto Fringe Ticket Giveaways for Shows on Tuesday, July 11th

Special Constables (Greenline Theatre and Circlesnake Productions) 2017 Toronto Fringe Review

Photo of cast members Connor Bradbury, Daniel Pagett, and Mikaela Dyke

From deep, deep within the dark zones of the Toronto subway system, a (literal) underground revolution is brewing, fronted by a metropass counterfeiting ring that puts Toronto’s commuters in mild danger of delay. There’s only one team capable of putting on the breaks: the (technically disbanded) TTC transit police. These Special Constables, if you will, are here to save the city at the 2017 Toronto Fringe Festival—but the conspiracy goes even deeper than you might think. Continue reading Special Constables (Greenline Theatre and Circlesnake Productions) 2017 Toronto Fringe Review

Kara Sevda (Now What Theatre) 2017 Toronto Fringe Review

photo of Tierney Nolen from Kara Sevda

It’s the end of the world, and two strangers find themselves sharing a bench in a train station, waiting for the lottery that will decide who gets to take the last train south from Paris. In Now What Theatre‘s Kara Sevda, playing as part of the 2017 Toronto Fringe Festival, the question is not so much if the world is ending, but what it means to keep surviving. Continue reading Kara Sevda (Now What Theatre) 2017 Toronto Fringe Review

Bugger the Butterfly, Or My Sci-Fi Hollywood Adventure (Pencil Neck Theatre) 2017 Toronto Fringe Review

Photo of Kenny Grenier and Gordon Harper by Anto Zerducci.

What would you do if you could turn back time? As it turns out, there are only so many ways humanity can profoundly change the course of history. When time travel hits the open market, it’s not long before everyone’s already done the good stuff. Someone’s already gotten to Hitler, so why not go back and change something a little more low-stakes? Like, say, the course of a beleaguered actor’s career? Such is the set-up of Bugger the Butterfly, a quirky and winning Twilight Zone-style comedy by Pencil Neck Theatre that’s currently playing as part of the 2017 Toronto Fringe Festival.
Continue reading Bugger the Butterfly, Or My Sci-Fi Hollywood Adventure (Pencil Neck Theatre) 2017 Toronto Fringe Review

Silence S’il Vous Plaît (Illusion, Coffee and Poetry) 2017 Toronto Fringe Review

photo of Melaine Petriw

Silence S’il Vous Plaît (Illusion, Coffee and Poetry‘s offering for the 2017 Toronto Fringe Festival) tells the story of two street mimes who fall in love over the course of one magical, romantic evening in Paris. Imagine a kind of silent-film version of Roman Holiday, but with queer mimes.

Of all the shows playing at Fringe this year, I was not expecting to be so utterly destroyed by mime girls in love. Especially when it started out with finger-guns. Continue reading Silence S’il Vous Plaît (Illusion, Coffee and Poetry) 2017 Toronto Fringe Review

Rough Magic (Theatre Arcturus) 2017 Toronto Fringe Review

photo of actor Lindsay BellaireOn a distant island awash in magic, an airy sprite and a tortured mortal meet and form a strange friendship. Together, the two negotiate the meaning of freedom while a distant threat looms over the island: Prospero, the infamous magician from Shakespeare’s The Tempest. Theatre Arcturus‘s Rough Magic takes Shakespeare’s The Tempest and gives it the Wicked treatment for the 2017 Toronto Fringe Festival, imagining a potential friendship between The Tempest‘s supporting characters Ariel and Caliban.

Oh, and aerial acrobatics. That part’s important.

Continue reading Rough Magic (Theatre Arcturus) 2017 Toronto Fringe Review

The Resurrectionists (House of Rebels Theatre) 2017 Toronto Fringe Review

picture of and old barn

When James and Oliver get themselves kicked out of medical school, they decide to start robbing graves in a madcap scheme to buy their way back in. Just your classic 19th Century buddy comedy. Really. Complete with a gun-toting maniac, unrequited love, and a cadaver that can’t manage to stay dead. That’s the basic setup of The Resurrectionists (House of Rebels Theatre), playing at the 2017 Toronto Fringe Festival. Continue reading The Resurrectionists (House of Rebels Theatre) 2017 Toronto Fringe Review