All posts by Keira Grant

Stitch (Dependent Theatre Projects) 2011 SummerWorks Review

Stitch is a one woman show about an oxy-addicted, single-mom porn-star with a mysterious, nagging and worsening vaginal infection of some kind. Throughout the play the infection – which she dubs Itchya – speaks to her; inciting self-hatred and convincing her to make foolish decisions.

Cara Gee as Kylie Grandview does a credible and professional job with the script she was given. There was no set, limited props and one fairly basic costume used during the entire performance. Minimalism was an effective choice for this production. Continue reading Stitch (Dependent Theatre Projects) 2011 SummerWorks Review

Gravestone Posse (The Canadian Space Opera Company) 2011 Toronto Fringe Review

The truth of the matter is I had a hard time focusing during Gravestone Posse. My mind went on a walk-about, straying to supper decisions and weekend diversions.

Perhaps this has more to do with the format of the work than the substance. This is not a play, but rather a radio faux-drama that was recorded live for future broadcast. The performers wore costumes appropriate to their caricaturized roles but the script was read into microphones. Continue reading Gravestone Posse (The Canadian Space Opera Company) 2011 Toronto Fringe Review

Remember, Maggy? (Maggy Productions) 2011 Toronto Fringe Review

The thing I enjoyed the most about Remember, Maggie? is that extraordinary mother-son writing duo Carol Anne and Matt Murray did not feel obliged to tie off all the loose ends at the show’s conclusion.

Remember, Maggie? was a lot like real relationships: painful, funny, unresolved, disquieting and beautiful. In this performance, a sister learns that loving someone does not make them a good person, and that a blood connection does not a sister make. Continue reading Remember, Maggy? (Maggy Productions) 2011 Toronto Fringe Review

Desperate Church Wives (Under the Blood Productions) 2011 Toronto Fringe Review

Grandma Word (Diane L. Johnstone) greets you at the door with cookies and a dish of gossip. I am inclined to give any production that begins by feeding me cookies a warm reception (I really love cookies).

I have to confess though, one-handers have always been a tough sell for me. There are notable exceptions of course (d’bi.young’s Dora award winning performance comes to mind) but in general, I think holding an audience’s attention all by your lonesome for an hour is an ambitious undertaking.

Continue reading Desperate Church Wives (Under the Blood Productions) 2011 Toronto Fringe Review