All posts by Madeleine Copp

Madeleine Copp saw her first show when she was four years old and it was love at first sight. She pursued a bachelor’s in theatre production and design and English literature, culminating in a love for flexible, innovative, and diverse theatre artists that challenge all our preconceived notions of the stage. Her thesis, Printed Voices: Women, Print, and Performance pushed for new interpretations of closet drama from the early modern to modern period in the hopes of seeing more female playwrights included in the performance canon. Since graduating, Madeleine continues to seek out unexpected, startling, and challenging works that leave her angry, speechless, and wonderfully confused.

Pulling the Nostalgia Strings: Puppetry at the Fringe

BakersDozen

At my second show of the Toronto Fringe Festival I had an interesting conversation with a volunteer. Both of us were puppet show fans and both of us were struck by the sheer amount of puppetry available at this year’s festival. Not counting children’s shows, there are at least seven separate adult puppet shows—assuming adult puppet shows are rated PG and up–that indicate a resurgence in puppet popularity. Continue reading Pulling the Nostalgia Strings: Puppetry at the Fringe

Those Shoes That Light Up (Dame Judy Dench) 2014 Toronto Fringe Review

Thoseshoesthatlightup

There may or may not be an underlying thematic connection between the various sketches of Dame Judy Dench’s Those Shoes That Light Up at the Toronto Fringe Festival, but as the show songs suggest, forget about it. The point here is the comedy.

Consisting of Jessica Greco, Claire Farmer, Chris Leveille, Shannon Lahaie, Gavin Pounds, team Dame Judy Dench deliver a fun night.

Continue reading Those Shoes That Light Up (Dame Judy Dench) 2014 Toronto Fringe Review

Oni (Mochinosha Puppet Company) 2014 Toronto Fringe Review

Oni

A modern adaptation of the popular Japanese folktale Issun-BoshiMochinosha Puppet Company’s Oni at the the Toronto Fringe Festival delivers a visual delight with Japanese shadow lantern puppets that inspires.

The entire play is narrated by storytellers Daniel Wishes and Seri Yanai, who simultaneously work a variety of paper puppets, control their lighting, and occasionally accompany dancing puppets with recorder renditions of popular theme songs.

Continue reading Oni (Mochinosha Puppet Company) 2014 Toronto Fringe Review

Who Killed Gertrude Crump? (Monster Theatre) 2014 Toronto Fringe Review

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There is only one question that needs to be answered in the premiere of Monster Theatre’s Who Killed Gertrude Crump? at the Toronto Fringe Festival, and I’m sure we can all guess what that is. Speaking from beyond the grave, puppet master Agatha Christie, played with delightful madness by Tara Travis, unravels an unpublished murder mystery from her early days.

Continue reading Who Killed Gertrude Crump? (Monster Theatre) 2014 Toronto Fringe Review

Great Battles in History (Mark Shyzer) 2014 Toronto Fringe Review

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If I had to sum up Great Battles in History by Mark Shyzer at the Toronto Fringe Festival in one word, I would call it an experience. This touching, hilarious, one-man show tells the story of a failed collaborative project that examined great historical battles from a futuristic perspective. Without giving much away, the story of the steadily declining production crew coupled with historical tidbits about past warlords reveals the significance of individual losses.

Continue reading Great Battles in History (Mark Shyzer) 2014 Toronto Fringe Review

Review: Left Hander in London and The Get Happy Hour with Judy

Left Hander

 

World Pride Double Bill Takes the Stage at the Revival Bar

The double bill Left Hander in London: The Earthquake and The Get Happy Hour with Judy at the Revival Bar are two very different performances with a lot to unpack. One is an examination of the significance of diversity, while the other is about the joy of celebrity nostalgia.

Continue reading Review: Left Hander in London and The Get Happy Hour with Judy

Review: A Clown’s Life in 2 acts

On stage in Toronto, the absurdist tragicomedy A Clown’s Life cracks many a joke but not all hit home

A Clown’s Life in 2 acts, playing at the Helen Gardiner Phelan Playhouse, sets a hard goal for itself. A tragicomedy following the lives of a clown (Christian Glas), an agent (Rocky Keller), and a starlet (Lauren Goodman) in the world of show business where a small mix up changes the course of their lives. The production is inspired by the absurdist plays of Samuel Beckett, Eugene Ionesco, and the comedy troupe Stella—tough acts to follow.

Continue reading Review: A Clown’s Life in 2 acts