All posts by Samantha Wu

Samantha is a writer and a fan of the arts and has been able to find numerous ways to pair the two. Aside from being an editor here at Mooney on Theatre, she’s a photojournalist for Lithium Magazine which gets her writing and shooting about everything from Dave Matthews Band to Fan Expo, and a copy editor/writer for Art Katalyst. She’s passionate about music, theatre, photography, writing, and celebrating sexuality — not necessarily in that order. She drinks tea more than coffee, prefer ciders over beers, and sings karaoke way too loudly. You can follow her on various social media including Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Mark Sepic’s O.C.D. (Obsessive Creative Disorder) 2011 Toronto Fringe Review

Mark Sepic’s O. C. D. is one man, Mark, on a small and intimate stage surrounded by a mismatched array of made, found, and fixed instruments, wires, pedals and his laptop hooked up to a projector. He plays for a small crowd – the focus being his OCD, Obsessive Creative Disorder, and the results of such a disorder. You are in for an hour of quirky and fun music. Continue reading Mark Sepic’s O.C.D. (Obsessive Creative Disorder) 2011 Toronto Fringe Review

Hushabye (Blood Orange Theatre) 2011 Toronto Fringe Review

When you dream at night, are your dreams created by your subconscious? Are they your dreams to keep or are they owned and filed away by a Ministry? And if your dreams are stored in some cosmic database, can you search the files for someone you’ve lost? This is Mary’s quest in Hushabye, a Blood Orange Theatre production written by Anna Standish and directed by Sarah Miller-Garvin. Continue reading Hushabye (Blood Orange Theatre) 2011 Toronto Fringe Review

Euripides’ Cyclops (Children of Wine) 2011 Toronto Fringe Review


What better way to start off the 2011 Toronto Fringe Festival than being heckled at and ushered by a troupe of naughty, raunchy Satyrs with long and impressive…err…dongs? If this also sounds like your idea of a good time then head over to the Fringe Club at Honest Ed’s parking lot (581 Bloor St. W) to witness Euripides’ Cyclops presented by Toronto’s Children of Wine, adapted and directed by Jessie Fraser. Continue reading Euripides’ Cyclops (Children of Wine) 2011 Toronto Fringe Review

Luminato 2011 Review: Andromache (Necessary Angel)

Necessary Angel productions present Andromache as part of this year’s Luminato Festival in Toronto directed by Graham McLaren collaborating with writer Evie Christie held at The Theatre Centre until June 19.

I love what’s happening with theatre these days. It’s become so much more than what I soaked up in my final high school years picking apart the Stanislavski method. The experience for the audience has grown beyond watching a show without a TV screen. Continue reading Luminato 2011 Review: Andromache (Necessary Angel)

Review: Tightrope (2boys.tv)

By Samantha Wu

 

Tightrope is a cabaret song cycle written by 2boys.tv and presented by Toronto’s Buddies in Bad Times Theatre that focuses on the concept of societal loss.

To be honest, I wasn’t quite sure what I was walking into when I decided to see Tightrope. When I read the words “cabaret”, “drag performers” and “song cycle”, I was immediately taken to the lively, brash and in-your-face drag queen shows that would sum up a great Saturday night in the Village. But the subject matter of societal loss and the threat of this loss fading from memory didn’t jive with what I was seeing in my mind. Continue reading Review: Tightrope (2boys.tv)

Review: Ismene (The Socratic Theatre Collective)

by Samantha Wu

Ismene is a production presented by Toronto’s Socratic Theatre Collective and written by Jeremy Menekseoglu that takes a modern look on a classic Greek Tragedy.

Ismene, the famed daughter of Oedipus and Jocasta and sister to Antigone, is sent to the Arktoi School for Unruly Girls after her participation in her sister’s rebellion. Outside the school’s walls the Chorus howls demanding that Ismene complete her family’s tragedy. Inside she bonds with other women from mythology who have fallen victim to tragedy and fate.

Continue reading Review: Ismene (The Socratic Theatre Collective)