All posts by Trevor Abes

Wounds to the Face (Randolph College) 2018 Toronto Fringe Review

Photo of Abigail Carey in Wounds to the Face.

For their production of Wounds to the Face, Howard Barker’s surreal treatise on identity, director Matjash Mrozewski and the actors from Randolph College have bitten off more than they can chew. Currently playing at the Annex Theatre, this Toronto Fringe offering relies too heavily on its amateur cast to carry a play where strong characters are the main dish.

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How to be FEARLESS! (With Roxy Roberts) (Binocular Theatre) 2018 Toronto Fringe Review

Photo of Ali Joy Richardson in How to be FEARLESS! (With Roxy Roberts).

How to be FEARLESS (With Roxy Roberts) — by Binocular Theatre — is a play about a firecracker of a motivation speaker and the self-defense course she creates in response to being harassed and threatened with physical violence. Currently showing at Bell Tower Coffee, this sure-fire Toronto Fringe favourite blends consistently sharp comedy, incisive drama, and a performance from Ali Joy Richardson (in the title role) that accepts nothing less than going for the fences.

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Review: Molly Bloom (Fourth Gorgon Theatre)

Fourth Gorgon Theatre explores the Ulysses character in four unique parts, playing in Toronto

The main draw for Molly Bloom — on stage at Majlis Art Garden until June 16 — is the precision and confidence that come from Fourth Gorgon Theatre having developed the show over the last five years. Seeing as we’re dealing with an adaptation of the last chapter of James Joyce’s notoriously dense Ulysses, cohesion is exactly what you’re looking for.

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Review: The ‘94 Club (Crave Productions)

Sexuality and identity are key themes in this play, now on stage at Toronto’s Tarragon Theatre

Entry to The ‘94 Club—currently running at the Tarragon Theatre—grants you a gorgeously written and deeply empathetic play about a crew of fifteen-year-old girls exploring their sexualities. They devise a competition among themselves to this end, one that makes for a riveting survey of sex, gender, and consent as they grapple with these concepts for the first time.

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Review: Tell Me What It’s Called and Mr. Truth (Tell Me Theatre, Lester Trips (Theatre), Why Not Theatre)

Two challenging, unconventional works currently playing on the Toronto stage

Tell Me What It’s Called and Mr. Truth are the latest examples of the quality independent theatre that the RISER Project has built its reputation on supporting. They are also the latest reasons why The Theatre Centre remains a leading space for risk-taking on stage.

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