Daily Picks from our Raves at the 2018 Toronto Fringe (July 7th)

image saying daily raves

We’re almost there, Toronto! We’ve now seen and reviewed 143 out of the ~160 shows at the 2018 Toronto Fringe Festival — and I’m here to showcase three of our favourites. Tonight, we’ve got a company with an outstanding local pedigree, a touring production that’s been polished until it sparkles, and an ambitious new queer musical about Toronto. Ready for the scoop?

Photo of Chris Baker and Janelle Hanna in Robert at Toronto Fringe 2018

Robert

What it’s about:
Kat and James are waiting for their father to die. Not exactly estranged, but certainly not close, the two struggle to make conversation until James reveals the worst secret he possibly could.

Why our reviewer loved it:
The pair’s ability to sway from jokes to heavy drama and back is a cleansing emotional workout. […]The pair react to one another that split second quicker than people who are thinking too hard about the gestures they’re supposed to be making. This does wonders for the illusion that what you are witnessing is real.

Read our full review here.

The Ding Dong Girls

What it’s about:
The Ding Dong Girls, the hilarious drag musical by Dora-winner Christopher Richards (Molly Wood) and author Gordon Bowness, is the mostly untrue legend of a cross-dressing misfit who gathers around him four other young gay men to form a madcap, politically-motivated drag troupe in early 1990s Toronto.

Why our reviewer loved it:
Near the end of the show Missy performs a tap number. It’s one of my favourite Fringe moments ever. I’ve been back and forth in my head about whether to describe it or not and decided not. It’s better seen. But the combination of the song, the dress, and the dancing is perfect, a nose-thumbing moment to remember. It’ll make me happy whenever I think of it.

Read our full review here.

Tymisha Harris as Josephine Baker, photo provided by the company

Josephine, A Burlesque Cabaret Dream Play

What it’s about:
This award-winning off-Broadway musical tells the story of the iconic Josephine Baker, the first African-American international superstar and one of the most remarkable figures of the 20th Century. Josephine shatters stereotypes of race, gender roles and sexuality in this intimate, charming and haunting cabaret with a twist.

Why our reviewer loved it:
Watching a performance with Harris dazzling me for an hour while cooing and strutting her stuff to music carefully honed and perfected by Tod Kimbro is worth it. Learning more about the remarkable life of the late great Josephine Baker is even better.

Read our full review here.

Leave a Reply