All posts by John Bourke

Sex, Drugs & the Holy Ghost (www.bourgee-bushwoman.com) – 2010 Toronto Fringe Review

By John Bourke

It’s difficult to put a categorize what kind of a show Sex, Drugs & the Holy Ghost really is, and it’s making it very difficult to write this review. Put simply, the show is a series of three vignettes where Diane Johnstone portrays three different women, each of whom is at a different point in their life, and have very different views on, well, everything.

Sex, Drugs & the Holy Ghost (Hereafter shortened to SDatHG) was performed and written by Diane Johnstone and directed by Winnie Wong. Continue reading Sex, Drugs & the Holy Ghost (www.bourgee-bushwoman.com) – 2010 Toronto Fringe Review

Under Analyse Me (The Go Two Company) – 2010 Toronto Fringe Review

By John Bourke

The Go Two Company‘s Under Analyse Me is a dance show that reflects on the ways we communicate with each other in an age when the tools of dialogue are as ubiquitous as they are complex and fallible.

I don’t have too much experience with dance or dance shows, so I was ready to do some squirming in my seat. Despite that, I was engaged from the start, and continued to be so throughout the 50 minute show. In fact, I was actually surprised when it was over.

Continue reading Under Analyse Me (The Go Two Company) – 2010 Toronto Fringe Review

New Talent (Theatre Erebus) – 2010 Toronto Fringe Review

By John Bourke

New Talent, presented by Hamilton’s Theatre Erebus, is a peek into the inner workings of Hamilton’s sex trade through the eyes of a single woman’s choice to become an escort.

Set in 1997 against the real-life backdrop of a massive and toxic fire in the city, New Talent features the writer and director Brian Morton as the matter-of-fact driver who introduces Christine to the world of the escort. Gregory Cruikshank plays Christine’s first client, a lovelorn computer technician who can’t find the time for a real relationship.

Continue reading New Talent (Theatre Erebus) – 2010 Toronto Fringe Review

The Boy Who Cried Wolf (TwoWolvesTheatreProductions.com) 2010 Toronto Fringe Review

In the spirit of full disclosure, I should confess at the very beginning of this post that I had to leave the show early. Not due to any fault of the production, but for reasons that will be mentioned a little later. So, keep that in mind as you read the rest of the review.

I discussed whether or not I should do a write up with my editor. She said that normally we would never actually publish a review based on a partial viewing, but there is no time for anyone to go back, and we really want to give the show some coverage. So, we decided to publish the review anyway.

The Boy Who Cried Wolf is part of the FringeKids! series, and is billed as a fun, modernist adaptation of Aesop’s classic fable, that is appropriate for the whole family. It’s directed by M.E. Jenkins, with the adaptation credited to the company.

Continue reading The Boy Who Cried Wolf (TwoWolvesTheatreProductions.com) 2010 Toronto Fringe Review

SketchFest 5th Anniversary Show & Party – Toronto Sketchfest

By John Bourke

sketchcomedy09Canada has a long history of producing great sketch comedy. There’s acts like Kids in the Hall, the Frantics, Wayne and Schuster, Codco, Federal political parties.

The difficulty is that there really aren’t that many places outside the comedy club circuit to really practice and develop the sketch comedy craft. This is where Toronto Sketchfest comes in. Bring artists from across Canada and the rest of the world, and give them a place to really stretch their legs.

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Debbie Does Dallas the Musical and Hedwig and the Angry Inch by Ghostlight Projects

I promise you right now that it was not because I really thought that there was any chance of seeing hardcore sex on stage at the Theatre Centre that made me want to see Ghostlight Projects production’s of Debbie Does Dallas the Musical & Hedwig and the Angry Inch. Honestly! My curiosity was piqued because I really didn’t have any idea how you could bring either of these shows to the stage successfully. Of course, Hedwig started as a stage production, but I didn’t know that at the time.

If you haven’t heard of Ghostlight Projects productions by the way, it’s because they’re brand new. Bringing to the stage versions of two cult movies, (one which features lots of sex, and the other lots of great music), is an excellent way to introduce themselves to Toronto audiences and hopefully make a name for themselves.

Continue reading Debbie Does Dallas the Musical and Hedwig and the Angry Inch by Ghostlight Projects

HYSTERIA 2009 – Blue Box by Carmen Aguirre

By John Bourke

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Carmen Aguirre, the author and performer of the piece, tells the audience at the opening of the show that Blue Box, is not the real title of the show. The real title is Blue Cunt, but she thought it would be difficult to publicise with that name. Fair enough, you really shouldn’t say cunt in public. It’s impolite. Blue Cunt, by the way, is apparently the female version of Blue Balls, which happens when you don’t get enough sex. I had never heard of it before this show – who says you don’t learn anything going to the theatre?

Blue “Box” is part of the 2009 Hysteria Festival at Buddies in Bad Times Theatre. It is a story pulled from Aguirre’s own life experiences. It tells of a youth in the Chilean resistance, her two husbands, encounters with a “vision man”, making a living as an arts worker in Vancouver, and having visitations from her dead grandmother.

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International Festival of Authors – Paul Quarrington: A Life in Music, Words, and on Screen

by John Bourke

quarrington09This year marks the 30th annual International Festival of Authors (IFOA) held at Harbourfront Centre in Toronto. Part of this 11 day long event was a tribute on Saturday to Paul Quarrington: A Life in Music, Words, and on Screen.

You might be asking yourself why a theatre website is writing about an author’s festival, but here at Mooney on Theatre we look at the idea of what constitutes ‘theatre’ in a very broad way. So that it includes a very wide variety of ‘performances’. Speaking of a wide variety of performances, the tribute to Paul Quarrington seemed to cover all the bases. It had speeches, live music, the occasional quotes from scripts, and even family slideshows.

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