All posts by Margaret Sulc

Me With You (Loose Leaf Theatre) 2015 Toronto Fringe Review

If you’ve never experienced devised theatre, Loose Leaf’s premiere production of Me With You at the 2015 Toronto Fringe is a powerful example. Oliver Georgiou and Myrthin Stagg claim the Factory Studio stage in order to perform a physically dynamic tale of two siblings and a history of mental illness. All proceeds from the performance will be donated to CAMH. Continue reading Me With You (Loose Leaf Theatre) 2015 Toronto Fringe Review

Adventures of a Redheaded Coffeeshop Girl (Rebecca Perry Productions) 2015 Toronto Fringe Review

redheaded_coffeeshop_adventures_fringe2015I am still shaking after the opening of Adventures of a Redheaded Coffeeshop Girl (Rebecca Perry Productions) at the 2015 Toronto Fringe. Part of that comes from the two cups of CSI Coffee Pubs cold brew I sampled in the line-up, but most of it comes from Joanie Little’s (Rebecca Perry) infectious energy and compelling story. Continue reading Adventures of a Redheaded Coffeeshop Girl (Rebecca Perry Productions) 2015 Toronto Fringe Review

Liver Diie: The Live Action Monster Maze Game Show Of Treasures and Horrors With Puppets (Liver Diie Productions) 2015 Toronto Fringe Review

Nasty puppets cavort and plot in Liver Diie Production’s FringeKids! premiere of Liver Diie: The Live Action Monster Maze Game Show of Treasures and Horrors at the Toronto Fringe. Continue reading Liver Diie: The Live Action Monster Maze Game Show Of Treasures and Horrors With Puppets (Liver Diie Productions) 2015 Toronto Fringe Review

Review: The Referendum (Luminato Festival)

Antonio Skármeta’s The Referendum tells the story of Chile’s democracy at Toronto’s Luminato Festival

When I left the bright Queen’s Quay and Harbourfront area, bustling with families and street performers, I feared I was leaving the summer joy behind when I entered the Fleck Dance Theater for Antonio Skármeta’s The Referendum, one of Luminato’s 7 Monologues series.

Thankfully the story he told about Chile and the political moment that changed that nation’s history in 1988 left me with a pensive, yet powerful optimism. Continue reading Review: The Referendum (Luminato Festival)