Cheap Theatre in Toronto the Week of February 13th, 2018

Five Shows Under $25 in Toronto this Week

Live theatre shows in Toronto with ticket prices of $25 or less, playing the week of February 13th, 2018. Perfect for the budget-conscious theatre-goer. This week’s selections feature Burlesque, Black History, and a little something for Babes n’ Toddlers. Check them out below the cut:

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Playlistings in Toronto for the week of February 12th

Shows That Caught Our Eye in Toronto the Week of February 12th, 2018

This week’s selections feature some racy Valentine’s Day shows for you and your sweetie. If you’re more of a revolutionary, check out one of the Black History Month appropriate shows. There is much to choose from, so here to help you chose is our Managing Editor Wayne, with a few of his top picks in red. Check them out below the cut:

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Review: The Humans (Canadian Stage and Citadel Theatre)

Cast of The Humans, Bluma Appel Theatre, Feb 2017

Tony-winning play The Humans takes to the Toronto stage!

Stephen Karam’s Tony award winning play, The Humans, opened at the Bluma Appel Theatre on Thursday evening. It’s a comedy/drama, funnier earlier on and more dramatic later, about a family Thanksgiving dinner that unfolds in real time, at just under two hours.

We’ve probably all experienced special occasion family dinners like this. Mom, Dad, Grandma (in this case Momo), and the adult kids get together. There’s joking and teasing and bickering and unsolicited advice and sometimes real tension. People talk over each other, little groups form, break apart, and form new groups; people laugh, sometimes they yell, sometimes they cry. They did in my family. And that’s what my friend Patricia and I loved about The Humans; they seemed like a real family. Continue reading Review: The Humans (Canadian Stage and Citadel Theatre)

Review: Tap Ex: Forbidden (Tapestry Opera)

Toronto’s Tapestry Opera fuses opera with Persian music for a new experimental opera

“You’ve probably never seen anything like this before,” says Tapestry Opera‘s general director Michael Hidetoshi Mori, also the director of Tap Ex: Forbidden, the latest in the company’s series of new, experimental operas. Although it’s uncommon for a director to appear on stage prior to a performance to explain their creative rationale, it’s an unusual show, and a little bit of encouragement makes it more accessible and rewarding.

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Review: Acha Bacha (Buddies In Bad Times & Theatre Passe Muraille)

TPM-17-18-Acha-Bacha_0003 Matt Nethersole and Qasim Khan Acha Bacha - Written by: Bilal Baig - Directed by: Brendan Healy - Set and Costume by: Joanna Yu - Lighting by: C.J AstronomoA new play by Bilal Baig in Toronto explores the intersections between queerness and Islamic culture

Seeing Acha Bacha on opening night at Theatre Passe Muraille was a study in contrast, from beginning to end. In moments I found it so bright and beautiful that I could barely stand to blink, and in other moments I struggled with wanting a different kind of experience. Overall I found this a promising work by a playwright who obviously holds tremendous potential. Continue reading Review: Acha Bacha (Buddies In Bad Times & Theatre Passe Muraille)

2018 Progress Review: Race Cards (curated by The Theatre Centre & Little Black Afro Theatre Company)

What does it mean to be Black? Is it better to have an ill-informed conversation about race or no conversation at all? How do you feel when you hear (or hear yourself saying) the word diverse? Why did Rachel Dolezal feel the need to be Black- to go one step beyond cultural appropriation into something else? What does the desire to be polite play in racism? What were you expecting from a piece called Race Cards? Selina Thompson, the creator of Race Cards, an ever-expanding installation and archive taking place at The Theatre Centre as part of the Progress Festival, invites you to answer one of the previous questions on race. Continue reading 2018 Progress Review: Race Cards (curated by The Theatre Centre & Little Black Afro Theatre Company)

2018 Progress Review: LOST in TRANS (FADO Performance Art Centre)

LOST in TRANS, conceived and performed by Dickie Beau, curated and presented by FADO Performance Art Centre, is currently running at The Theatre Centre as part of Progress Festival. Taking found audio recordings, Beau channels disparate personae and weaves them together to create an offbeat and haunting universe of misplaced characters. Their voices seem to flow through his body, revealing their desires and suggesting rich interior lives that have become lost in space and time. Continue reading 2018 Progress Review: LOST in TRANS (FADO Performance Art Centre)

Review: Jewel (Shotgun Juliet)

Pip Dwyer in JewelJewel, a one-woman play about the aftermath of the Ocean Ranger disaster opens in Toronto

Shotgun Juliet’s production of Jewel opened on Wednesday at Red Sandcastle Theatre. It’s a perfect venue; small and intimate, the audience could reach out and touch the actors – if that wasn’t an incredibly inappropriate thing to do.

Jewel is an intimate, one woman play written by Joan MacLeod. It looks at the aftermath of the Ocean Ranger disaster through the eyes of the young widow of one of the 84 men killed when it sank on February 15, 1982. It was written in 1987 when it wasn’t as common as it is now to look at disasters through the eyes of the survivors. It’s poignant without being maudlin. I really liked everything about it. Continue reading Review: Jewel (Shotgun Juliet)

Review: Ipperwash (Native Earth)

Harsh history and present day reality are explored in a new play now playing in Toronto

Ipperwash, onstage now at Native Earth, is a fictional story based on the true events of the Stoney Point reserve, which was forcibly moved to the neighbouring reserve of Kettle Point in 1942 by the federal Department of Defence. There they established Camp Ipperwash, a military training base, with the promise to return the land after the war was over. However, the area was left contaminated, riddled with land mines.

In the play, set in the present day, an army veteran who is also Indigenous named Bea (PJ Prudat), arrives, employed on the clean up. As she develops relationships with two of the people who live there, Tim Cloud (Jonathan Fisher) and his nephew Slip (James Dallas Smith), while also being visited by the ghost of Tim’s sister Kwe (Samantha Brown), she grows aware of the history of the land and the powerful toll it took on the people of Stoney Point. Continue reading Review: Ipperwash (Native Earth)